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ASUS ROG Strix AMD Radeon RX 6750 XT review

Does the refresh offer enough to close out the generation?

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With no official announcements until the release, the RDNA2 refresh of RX 6X50 graphic cards has landed. AMD injects some life into the aging generation, from which we review ASUS’ ROG Strix RX 6750 XT. The new selection aims to be the clear choice of graphics cards for the consumer. Competing against Nvidia’s range and the incoming Intel ARC Alchemist GPUs. All of them compete for the best graphics card choice.

The main changes across the new cards are the core clock and memory clock increase across the board. This also lends itself to an increased TBP and price for the new stock of cards. With the rumors suggesting this release will replace the old cards, there may be a consideration to buying the cheaper options.

This refresh does also come at a time close to when we think this generation of GPUs will be coming to a close. As the next RTX 40 series and RDNA3 are being rumored to release in the second half of 2022. So these new cards may be the last binned choices of the generation. Bringing new and improved to finish off its run of RDNA2 cards.

ROG Strix RX 6750 XT box

ASUS ROG Strix AMD Radeon RX 6750 XT

Core Clock Speed
1614 MHz base, 2729 MHz boost, 2623 game
Stream Processors
2560
Memory Size
12GB GDDR6
Dimensions
330 x 140 x 60 mm
PSU Required
650W

Packaging and build

Being the ROG Strix RX 6750 XT, there is nothing to fault with ASUS packaging once again. It has nailed the formula with a tightly fitted foam insert holding the precious cargo in. Preventing any jostling and damage during transport. Especially with shipping and the well-known careful delivery drivers.

Unpacking the card we get the sizeable graphics card. Wrapped up in antistatic and protective plastic. Peeling this off can be a bit of a chore but it has improved with this particular design having fewer crevices than other Strix offerings.

In its design, there is some variation in the Strix formula. The backplate in particular lacks the metallic accent around the vent hole. Whilst also providing a larger pass-through gap for better ventilation. Which is the Radeon variation compared to the RTX designs.

The hole is there for the near 3-slot heatsink along with the six heat pipes. Both of which work well together to transfer and spread out the heat generated by the die. Then the large surface area allows the three axial tech fans to remove all that waste.

Other than that you find the same zig-zag metallic pattern on the front surrounding the fans. Along with the RGB bar alongside the edge outwards to you, controlled by AURA sync as well. The IO shield is further stabilized and solid with six screws holding it in. Altogether providing a great quality build that you’d expect to last and provide the best performance.

ROG Herculx graphics holder

With the ever-growing size and weight of graphics cards from the power and TDP increases, there is an issue for sag. A slot in card will usually only be supported from the PCIe slot and IO bracket. So with increasing weight, the moment force on the edge of the card furthest away grows and over time your card will bend. Although usually, it won’t cause any issues it can affect resale value and aesthetics.

So some graphics cards will come with an included sag bracket or stand. This gives another anchor point to relieve the weight. However, they’re not always the most aesthetically pleasing inclusions. In that case, you can consider finding yourself an aftermarket option.

In our case, we tested out the ROG Herculx graphics card holder. It offers a great pairing to the Strix selection of cards. As it is designed with an AURA sync printed screen capable of lighting up in RGB alongside the rest of your system. With two height adjustment mechanisms, both for the main body moving up and a small stem rising up with a wheel turn. This offers precise height adjustment to just fit right. And with the built-in magnetic spirit level to ensure it all fits in. Although it may seem over-engineered with a quick-release for the height, it does give a lot of customization. Whilst also ensuring your gear is secure.

Specifications and price

Tech Specs

Core Clock Speed

1614 MHz base, 2729 MHz boost, 2623 game

Stream Processors

2560

Memory Size

12GB GDDR6

Dimensions

330 x 140 x 60 mm

PSU Required

650W

Thermal Design

2.9 slot heatsink with three axial fans

Memory Clock

18 Gbps

Memory Interface

192-bit

Card Bus

PCIe 4.0 x16

Output

3x DisplayPort 1.4a, 1x HDMI 2.1

Power Connectors

2x 8-pin

Pros
  • Excellent cooling to prolong life
  • Great overclocking opportunity
  • Biggest factory overclock
Cons
  • RX 6750 XT only max 9% faster than 6700 XT for 15% price hike
  • More expensive option from selection

The core specifications of the RX 6750 XT have been kept the same as the 6700 XT. Using the same Navi 22 XT die there is no change in the core count of the refresh. The same is the case for the VRAM of the GPU. With the same 12GB of GDDR6 being utilized.

However, the difference comes from the clock rate of those components. The base clock of the silicon has stayed the same but the boost clock has increased to 2600 MHz from the 2581 MHz of the 6700 XT. The game clock also followed suit with an improvement to 2495 MHz compared to 2424 MHz. Both are altered further by the overclocked version of the Strix card. Set to 2729 MHz boost with our card peaking at 2723 MHz. While the game clock is in the range of 2623 MHz.

The memory clock has also been increased by two Gbps. Upping it to 18 Gbps improves the bandwidth up to 432 GB/s. Overall improving the speed of the card and likely improved performance.

However, the extra work to get these numbers does come at an extra cost. With the total board power of the card increasing by 20W. Bringing the total up to 250 W. So you’ll be needing some more juice and feel a bit more heat. But it’s nothing too demanding to have to worry about.

With the slight upgrade, there is also a slight price increase to cover it. The new AMD card is going to cost $549. Which is $70 more than the original RX 6700 XT. A 15% increase in price that we’re not sure the performance can keep up with.

ROG Strix RX 6750 XT box
RX 6700 XTRX 6750 XT
GPUNavi 22 XTNavi 22 XT
Cores25602560
RT cores4040
TMUs160160
Memory12GB GDDR612GB GDDR6
Base clock2321 MHz2321 MHz
Boost clock2581 MHz2600 MHz
Memory clock16 Gbps18 Gbps
Memory bandwidth384 GB/s432 GB/s
TBP230 W250 W

Thermal design and cooling

As a Strix card, there is an easy repeatable formula that ROG can follow and works for them. With 3 slot cooling, it offers a great thermal capacity with the heatsink clinging onto the GPU. Along with six heat pipes, you get a fast and efficient spread of the energy for dispersal.

This works alongside the three axial tech fans that rapidly and quietly run to transfer that heat to the air. So with the backplate cutout and large surface area, you can be sure that the die is kept under control. Otherwise, you’ll be losing out on performance with thermal throttling.

Throughout our testing, the graphics card maxed out at 58°C even after prolonged thermal tests. Showing that the cooler is plenty strong for the TBP and overclocking on the card. Allowing for some overhead in terms of overclocking and pushing the card even further.

ROG Strix RX 6750 XT performance

From AMD’s presentation, we know they’re aiming to push their cards further against the current opposition. So in terms of the RX 6750 XT, it’s gaining a lead on the RTX 3070. With no mention of and lacking extra power to go up against the Ti variant. Even though the price is in between the two Nvidia options.

For testing, we had the optimized 22.1 driver from AMD and didn’t encounter any faults with it. So this is likely to be the actual release version.

Our test bench:

  • CPU: AMD Ryzen 5 5600x
  • Cooler: BeQuiet Dark Rock 4
  • RAM: Corsair 2x8GB 3200MHz Corsair Vengeance (XMP)
  • Motherboard: AORUS X570 Pro (re-sizeable bar enabled)
  • PSU: AORUS AP750GM 
  • Case: Cooler Master MF 700

One of the clear goals for AMD with the RX 6750 XT was going up against the RTX 3070. And in a lot of cases, it does improve upon it. Compared to its previous older model, the 6700 XT, the 750 manages to improve up to 9%. Whilst comparing with eh 3070 it can range from +20% to -12%.

Even so, the card itself does offer great 1440p performance. With plenty of titles in the three-digit framerate for a good experience. Whilst ray tracing is still hard-hitting for AMD it is still manageable in most titles, reaching at least 60 FPS in the games.

Conclusion

Although a good idea on paper to bring something new to the ending generation. The RX 6750 XT does lack the oomph we expected. What we thought might be a contender against Nvidia’s Ti cards, AMD is more set about improving the fight against its competition. And compared to the RTX 3070 it doesn’t exceed much above it whilst also increasing the price over the MSRP by $50. Although if you can find this one for cheaper it is the better alternative when the market is still shaky.

However, the ROG Strix variation is yet to disappoint. With such a high quality and robust build, it feels the price. The build offers a great cooling solution that will keep your die under wraps. Unlikely to throttle as well as offer the great overclocking opportunity to push it even further. The model offers the best of the range although it may cost you a bit extra.

ASUS ROG Strix AMD Radeon RX 6750 XT

Core Clock Speed
1614 MHz base, 2729 MHz boost, 2623 game
Stream Processors
2560
Memory Size
12GB GDDR6
Dimensions
330 x 140 x 60 mm
PSU Required
650W

Product Benchmarker and Writer AT WEPC

Sebastian Kozlowski

After taking apart and tinkering with the home PC and other electronics, Seb went to study Mechanical Engineering at the University of Manchester to try and explore everything in parts. After he graduated he realised how different the adult world was and decided to pursue work in the tech industry after spending too much time playing games (mostly CS:GO), keeping up with everything tech, and being everyone's go-to for PCs.

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